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The Platypus is stranger than you think.

Platypuses have no nipples.  After the young hatch, the mother oozes milk from the pores all over her body.

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Author Topic: Automatic docking  (Read 1975 times)

Offline vishniac

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Automatic docking
« on: November 04, 2011, 03:18:06 PM »
Hello!

China just realised their first automatic docking in space.
Russia are used to it with Progress, ESA with ATV.

But I think I have read that the US have never tested any automatic docking. They just performed piloted ones.

I can't find any answer on this on astronautix.com
Does someone know?
The popular stereotype of the researcher is that of a skeptic and a pessimist. Nothing could be further from the truth! Scientists must be optimists at heart, in order to block out the incessant chorus of those who say "It cannot be done."
Academician Prokhor Zakharov, University Commencement

Offline yale

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Re: Automatic docking
« Reply #1 on: November 05, 2011, 10:02:17 PM »
That is generally correct. There have been some automated rendezvous tests and also a docking between 2 satellites launched on the same booster
http://www.boeing.com/bds/phantom_works/orbital/oe_057.html

.US spacecraft have a history of being piloted. Astronauts are quite resistant to being "passengers" of their spacecraft.The new private spacecraft, such as Dragon, will be automated. Even then, the final docking will be done with the space station "arm".
« Last Edit: November 05, 2011, 10:29:57 PM by yale »
The last train out of any station will not be full of nice guys
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Offline vishniac

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Re: Automatic docking
« Reply #2 on: November 08, 2011, 10:42:34 AM »
Yales, happy to read you again!

I remember having read that a New Millenium mission would have tested automatic docking but I can't find it yet. Cancelled perhaps!

Astronauts being adamant to pilot everything led NASA without a very useful tool for automatic probes: Mars Sample Return would need automatic docking.So, does it mean that China is indeed more advanced in this field than the US?people tend to look down on them because their missions are few but each one scores.
« Last Edit: November 08, 2011, 10:44:11 AM by vishniac »
The popular stereotype of the researcher is that of a skeptic and a pessimist. Nothing could be further from the truth! Scientists must be optimists at heart, in order to block out the incessant chorus of those who say "It cannot be done."
Academician Prokhor Zakharov, University Commencement

 

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